Infinite Justice (2001) - Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID

Infinite Justice (2001) - Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID

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hassibah replied to your post: “sooooo MEEM emailed a few months ago and asked me to remove the…”:
did you ask them if the book is ever going to be in print again?

they said they are working on a free e-version arabic and english version that is accessible to everyone, including people with disabilities; which was the reason they asked me to pull it down. 

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hassibahthe book isn't copyrighted though or owned by any publicationapparently

sooooo MEEM emailed a few months ago and asked me to remove the photocopied version of the Bareed Mista3jil book that I had posted earlier. 

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but it is no longer avaliable sorryI just found out

The Container and the Contained (2011) - Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID

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izotecipotx:

isqineeha:

izotecipotx replied to your post: “whoneedstransitions replied to your post: “What do you think about…”:
oOoOoh i’d really love to hear which ideas you don’t gel with. i think i might be missing context ~probably~ but i’m like a lil confused by fatima’s wawa complex. n lol yes i have a whole sophia al maria tag [shrine] lol

I love her Wawa series! Yes though, the series has some context with regards to Arab pop music artists and to gender roles/identities in the gulf, I can go more in detail of what I understood from it if you want. But some of the things that I didn’t gel with for example was Monira al Qadiri’s recent series that was featured on reorient for example in which she described as “Wahhabi Cubism” when referring to the religious street murals she encountered in Kuwait and transformed into her art. The term Wahhabi is very problematic and has been highly generalized in both the west and the ME, which is why I don’t agree with the manner she employed it in her series.

oh yes! i posted the piece but later on found out about that term n was like “oh” cuz i saw the piece elsewhere, not on reorient n it had a different worded description. how do u feel about monira darkening her face in that video about masculinity? that incorporates song? Also yeah I felt I didn’t know ENOUGH about arab pop star history. like lol i love haifa but her mannerisms etc were so so different than the older gen. pop stars mentioned in in sophia al-maria’s book. she kinda touches on it in the prolouge, just kinda describes her dad as a young boy at the mosque watching the only tv in miles n seeing this old popstar sing n like right away it i made the link that generationally pop stars were marketed differently etc maybe 50 yrs before haifa and nancy etc. n then i read some other things but yeah i felt i was missing it. i’d love to hear it. Also Fatima and Sophia have made art about gender identities in the gulf. Idk if they are using terms that are problematic but Sophia in her memoir writes a lot about who she labels “Boyas”   [not in a bad way when she talks about them] and I forget back I think fatima or monira at one point or maybe they still do, identified that way? 

That was another aspect that annoyed me as well, in that series she solely speaks about gender roles and doesn’t tackle any theme that deals with racial stereotypes or racism so I didn’t understand what was darkening the face for? aaah yes I noticed your love haifa for haifa haha! one of the references in the Wawa series are from Nancy Ajram songs too. That makes me want to read her book more! Yes, “Boya” is what is being referred to in Wawa series, afaik the term is used derogatorily by in the gulf (mainly in Kuwait), but has also been reclaimed by those who identify with it. Back to the Wawa series I think she was trying to create this relation between the music of the period, which were most often socially prescribed as music girls would listen to and thus creating this polarization of gender with regards to music and dress and fashion .. etc, when really all this does is ignores the gender diversity that exists in those societies, who do or don’t necessarily identify with such music and/or style. In a sense she was combating such stereotypes and prescribed identities, at least thats what I understood. Oh yah? I didn’t know about fatima or monira identifying as such! 

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I think one can safely assume that no Arab government from Nasser to this day have stood with the Palestinian cause for the sake of Palestine and the Palestinians; 1956, 1967, 1973 and on. All of those wars have been to serve the ulterior agendas of those government and leaders involved rather than the clear liberation of Palestine. They have all traded in the Palestinian cause to charge their populations emotionally and militarily in order to motivate them to fight under those false pretences. That is not to minimize the sacrifices of those who lost their lives, their loved ones, and their families fighting against the Israeli occupation and settler colonialism.

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isqineeha:

Appear As You Are, Be As You Appear (2013)
Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID

Jacket made with fabric and steel needles.

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isqineeha:

Wound is a Place Where Light Enters (2012)Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID
You may have noticed that many of the titles Aisha Khalid chooses for her pieces are quotes from poems by Rumi.

isqineeha:

Wound is a Place Where Light Enters (2012)
Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID

You may have noticed that many of the titles Aisha Khalid chooses for her pieces are quotes from poems by Rumi.

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or at least as it have been translated by white ppl

isqineeha:

Kashmiri Shawl (2011) - Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID

Kashmiri Shawl is a site specific installation of a pashmina scarf combined with gold plated steel pins. The piece means to bring attention to the issue of Kashmir and the struggles of the Kashmiri people are suffering from due to the lack of the local and global attention to the geopolitical issues of the region. In an interview with the Sharjah Art Foundation, Aisha Khalid described the process and story behind this Shawl: 

this piece is about what’s happening in Kashmir because whenever I travel to the West I was always take for my friends, Kashmiri scarf or shawl, something like that. If I ask someone, what shall I bring for you, they always say Kashmiri shawl or something. And I also saw that it’s high fashion in west, it’s a very expensive thing; pashmina, Kashmiri wool, it’s like, you know 100% Kashmir wool … So, it’s all over the world but people don’t think about where this beauty and this luxury is coming from, and how the people are suffering. No-one is thinking about that and it’s a very bad situation in Kashmir -Occupied Kashmir, Indian Occupied Kashmir, I must say- every day they are killing people and on the media they say these are the rebels, but they are just fighting for their rights! After 1995 there’s no elections in Kashmir happened, and those were also fake elections, they did not allow everyone to participate in those elections, they are showing to media very different situation but actual situation is very different.So, I was just thinking that one side of this shawl is black with the gold, you see and you feel like it’s a beautiful embroidered fabric. When you see the other side, you can’t see from here, you see the other side is red and with the sharp edges of pins. So always it’s like making beauty and keeping it, you have to give something for that, a price for that. So they are trading these shawls but what’s happening with those people, no-one is concerned about. 

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isqineeha:

Pattern to Follow (2013) - Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID

Part of Aisha Khalid’s belief in the spirituality and divinity the infinite geometric shapes can provide, Pattern to Follow seeks to create images that are relative to Islamic and Pakistani art in a manner that doesn’t restrict the viewers to the image infront of their eyes. Instead, Aisha creates images that allow the viewers to explore for themselves the levels of spirituality these patterns and layers pave the way for them to follow.
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FEATURE: Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID

isqineeha:

image

Aisha Khalid is a Pakistani multimedia artist who was born in 1972 in Faisalabad, Pakistan. Aisha completed her BFA in 1997 from the National College of Arts in Lahore, Pakistan. From 1997 and until 2000, Aisha participated in several group and solo exhibitions  in Pakistan, including a two person exhibition in 1999 and 2000 with pakistani artist Imran Quershi, whom she later shared two other exhibitions in 2005 and 2010 in Karachi and London, respectively. Afterwards, she moved to Amsterdam in 2001 until 2002 to complete her post graduate studies. 

Aisha’s work is highly influenced by the traditional miniature paintings of the Mughul empire, in which she uses the political and cultural nature of these paintings to portray current pakistani and global affairs using contemporary materials and themes. Aisha Khalid is an extremely versatile artist who tackled several important issues in her work, including political and social prejudices after 9/11, issues that are specific to women, particularly women of color, and their rights in Pakistan and elsewhere, and issues that relate to her own personal experiences as a Pakistani Muslim woman. A main component of Aisha’s work is the usage of geometric shapes and their incorporation into paintings and collages that depict and tackle political and social issues, thus mixing two components that rarely combine. 

A recent and very important piece by Aisha Khalid is titled “Kashmiri Shawl”, which is a site specific installation of a pashmina scarf combined with gold plated steel pins. The piece meant to bring attention to the issue of Kashmir and the struggles of the Kashmiri people are suffering from due to the lack of the local and global attention to the geopolitical issues of the region. 

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