I met this egyptian guy today who introduced himself as “Mike”, but really he is Mamdouh lmao

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why do you do that to yourselves broz
hassibah replied to your post: “hassibah replied to your post: “hassibah replied to your post: “I…”:
true. there’s a lot of self loathing also and it gets worse the worse things get in iraq-the diaspora just acts as if the actual place does not exist anymore. but if yr going to naively idealize smth why not the independence period? ppl are weird.

aah definitely, I have experienced that loathing myself at times tbh. I think you have mentioned that before, but the iraqi diaspora is probably one of the most diasporas disconnected from their homeland. What I am seeing now is something similar to what is occurring in Iraq; replacement of citizenship and nationality, with religious and ethnic identities. You know, sometimes those who idealize that monarchy are the same ones who idealize Kassem, and it is just soo hilarious yet sad.

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ziyati replied to your post: “ziyati replied to your post: “ziyati replied to your post: “we…”:
its so sectarian and no one wants to be honest or want a politics that is good for the people. they only want a politics that is good for their sect. it’s disgusting.

that is the sad reality. and when you speak against such bs, even if you are an atheist (or don’t identify with any group) you are instantly branded as a *sectarian*, because everything has been mixed up so bad, and everyone has drank from the same toxic well. this is iraqi politics in simple form tbh 

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ziyati replied to your post: “ziyati replied to your post: “we constantly criticize identity…”:
i’ve seen ppl on here try to apply privilege politics to different ethnicities in pakistan and afghanistan, ‘pashtun, punjabi privilege’ ‘sunni priv… and its just so out of touch with the reality of the ppl who actually live + toil + suffer there

same thing with Iraq post-2003 and the voices that we have been hearing since. that is not say some of those privileges might have existed (speaking of iraq), but at the same time such politics have been employed in situations that are stripped from reality as you mentioned, and also serving sectarian agendas.

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hassibah replied to your post: “hassibah replied to your post: “I think one can safely assume that no…”:
yeah i’ve definitely seen ppl who idealize that period, but i have also seen lots of pro british iraqis so i always assumed they and the monarchists were one and the same. ppl are so weird but i guess iraqis have their own special brand of denial

I think most of the pro-british iraqis I have encountered have been from previous generations, but with monarchists I have seen it across the age spectrum. Idk I feel Iraqis generally idolize the west be it british or not, and I am not sure if their idolization of the british is due to lack of knowledge of their own and the region’s history, or if they chose to overlook it because deep down they are a little bit monarchists. We definitely have extremely weird politics. 

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ziyati replied to your post: “we constantly criticize identity politics on here, yet I have been…”:
hundred percent agreed, or when oppression status inherent in an identity is used to justify one’s dumb bullshit opinion while they type sitting in the west &not even in native country. identity politics don’t just operate in a ‘western’ framework.

that is one of the main reasons why identity politics is horrible. Those identities will be abused and will often become the justification for such bs that widens the rift between the different groups of people. 

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we constantly criticize identity politics on here, yet I have been lately noticing how this tumblr platform has been reinforcing such constrained and selective identities that clearly do more harm than good. I mean when I look at Iraqis on tumblr I notice how the same reinforcements of tribe/sect/class that have shaken the Iraqi society over time are being repeated here. Yes, mostly are done unintentionally in a sense, but that is exactly how it becomes harmful; when it becomes very spontaneous and normalized. This might include myself, Idk, and it also extends to other groups as well not just iraqis. But again, there are cases when holding such identities and maintaining them is important and i am not referring to those. I am referring to identities that are perpetuated casually and doesn’t contribute to a certain status of oppression. 

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for example when you say you are from this tribe or that tribe what does that contribute to your existence on here?what is your end goal?and why would we be interested in that?

ziyati replied to your post: I think one can safely assume that no …

ya Palestine is used for nationalism that inflames the ppl in favor of the current govt/regime and veils that the govt is either doing fuck all for Palestine or in fact collaborating w Israel against interests of Palestinians

yes, it is mostly arab nationalists and their employment of Palestine. I mean we are even seeing this with Assad-ists and Saddam-ists nowadays.

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hassibah replied to your post: “I think one can safely assume that no Arab government from Nasser to…”:
wait are ppl in that much denial abt the monarchy being pro british? like how is that possible if you know anything about it?

it always baffles me how many Iraqis choose to overlook that aspect of the monarchy merely because for them they imagine it as a peaceful / prosperous period, which is not true of course. It is always beautified in their view.

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http://isqineeha.tumblr.com/post/96041741724/i-think-one-can-safely-assume-that-no-arab ]

isqineeha:

I think one can safely assume that no Arab government from Nasser to this day have stood with the Palestinian cause for the sake of Palestine and the Palestinians; 1956, 1967, 1973 and on. All of those wars have been to serve the ulterior agendas of those government and leaders involved rather…

And even with regards to Iraq and their involvement in 1948 on a governmental level, they have traded with the lives of the few hundreds they sent to Palestine, which my grandfather allah yer7ama fought in, in order to portray themselves as part of a united front in the face of Zionism. But whether iraqis admit or not, the monarchy were slaves to the British who were the root cause for the occupation of palestine. Plus the monarchy and Nuri as Said supported the atrocities committed by zionist underground organizations in Iraq against Jewish Iraqis, whether adherent to zionism now or not.

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I think one can safely assume that no Arab government from Nasser to this day have stood with the Palestinian cause for the sake of Palestine and the Palestinians; 1956, 1967, 1973 and on. All of those wars have been to serve the ulterior agendas of those government and leaders involved rather than the clear liberation of Palestine. They have all traded in the Palestinian cause to charge their populations emotionally and militarily in order to motivate them to fight under those false pretences. That is not to minimize the sacrifices of those who lost their lives, their loved ones, and their families fighting against the Israeli occupation and settler colonialism.

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isqineeha:

Appear As You Are, Be As You Appear (2013)
Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID

Jacket made with fabric and steel needles.

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isqineeha:

Wound is a Place Where Light Enters (2012)Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID
You may have noticed that many of the titles Aisha Khalid chooses for her pieces are quotes from poems by Rumi.

isqineeha:

Wound is a Place Where Light Enters (2012)
Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID

You may have noticed that many of the titles Aisha Khalid chooses for her pieces are quotes from poems by Rumi.

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or at least as it have been translated by white ppl

isqineeha:

Kashmiri Shawl (2011) - Pakistani Artist AISHA KHALID

Kashmiri Shawl is a site specific installation of a pashmina scarf combined with gold plated steel pins. The piece means to bring attention to the issue of Kashmir and the struggles of the Kashmiri people are suffering from due to the lack of the local and global attention to the geopolitical issues of the region. In an interview with the Sharjah Art Foundation, Aisha Khalid described the process and story behind this Shawl: 

this piece is about what’s happening in Kashmir because whenever I travel to the West I was always take for my friends, Kashmiri scarf or shawl, something like that. If I ask someone, what shall I bring for you, they always say Kashmiri shawl or something. And I also saw that it’s high fashion in west, it’s a very expensive thing; pashmina, Kashmiri wool, it’s like, you know 100% Kashmir wool … So, it’s all over the world but people don’t think about where this beauty and this luxury is coming from, and how the people are suffering. No-one is thinking about that and it’s a very bad situation in Kashmir -Occupied Kashmir, Indian Occupied Kashmir, I must say- every day they are killing people and on the media they say these are the rebels, but they are just fighting for their rights! After 1995 there’s no elections in Kashmir happened, and those were also fake elections, they did not allow everyone to participate in those elections, they are showing to media very different situation but actual situation is very different.So, I was just thinking that one side of this shawl is black with the gold, you see and you feel like it’s a beautiful embroidered fabric. When you see the other side, you can’t see from here, you see the other side is red and with the sharp edges of pins. So always it’s like making beauty and keeping it, you have to give something for that, a price for that. So they are trading these shawls but what’s happening with those people, no-one is concerned about. 

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redphilistine replied to your post: “So now Mishan Al Jubori is becoming an authentic source? please. Stop…”:
wait so did tikritis/baathists have a hand in the disappearance of the students or no?

I don’t know. Control over spiker (its a massive base) has been going back and forth for the past few months between ISIS and the Iraqi Military, and the disappearance and execution of the students + soldiers occurred more than month ago, if not two months, and ISIS claimed responsibility if I am not mistaken. Tikrit is a city of more than 300K, so I don’t know why are people assuming they are all Ba’athists just because it was the dictator’s home town? and I don’t know how can people on here say lets “level a city down”. The city itself has been a battle front between Iraqi tribes, Iraqi military, and ISIS and most sources for the past few weeks have been highlighting that more than 90% of the population has left the city. There is only one officially Ba’athist group functioning in Iraq militaristically now and that is the Naqshabandi order, which is a Sufi/Ba’athist hybrid led by Ezat al Duri, and they aren’t that well organized or weaponized. What I am saying is that Mishan Al Juborri has never been an authentic source, he is one of those figures known to be bought with a few thousand $$$ in order to propagate hate and instigate the people; the guy used to come up on Al etejah al mo3akes on aljazeera for gods sake thats enough to discredit him for life. 

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redphilistineهو و أبنه ثنين من أكبر الحرامية بالعراق و سوريا