tbh fuck you if you chose to protest for climate change but not for Palestine.

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isqineeha:

Untitled (1980s) - Iraqi Artist MAHOOD AHMED

This is the only painting of Mahood from Iraq’s National Museum of Modern Art collection that has been found and restored after the museum’s looting in 2003 following the invasion and occupation of Iraq.

isqineeha:

Untitled (1980s) - Iraqi Artist MAHOOD AHMED

This is the only painting of Mahood from Iraq’s National Museum of Modern Art collection that has been found and restored after the museum’s looting in 2003 following the invasion and occupation of Iraq.

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FEATURE: Iraqi Artist MAHOOD AHMED

isqineeha:

        image

MAHOOD AHMED is an Iraqi Painter who was born in 1940 in Maysan (South of Iraq), a region that is considered the cradle for the Akkadian and Sumerian civilization and also known for maintaining the traditional culture of Mesopotamian Marshlands; from which he acquired the title “Son of the Marshes” used in many of his writings. Mahood Ahmed spent most of his life in academia; beginning in 1959 when he completed his studies in the Institute of Fine Arts in Baghdad, then he moved to Russia and acquired a Masters of Arts in 1967. He later went on to acquire his PhD in Science of Art from the Institute for Theoretical Studies in Moscow in 1979. After his completion of his studies he joined the University of Baghdad and was stationed as a Professor of Art Sciences in 1996, a position he still currently holds and was given honours for it being the oldest professor at the University of Baghdad in 2005. He is also a founding member of of the Faculty of Fine Arts at the University of Salahuddin in Erbil, Kurdistan. His academic accomplishments are extremely distinguished, much like his artistic productions, which has been featured in galleries all over the world, most recently in the UAE and Algeria. 

The first time that I came across his work it reminded me of Iraqi painter Afifa Aleiby and her Russian figurative style that is highly infused by symbolic surrealism. This is not a surprise considering that they both spent a good period of their life studying painting in Moscow, during different years of course with Afifa Aleiby being most recent, so I think its more accurate to say that Afifa Aleiby’s work is highly influenced by Mahood’s themes and style. 

Like many Iraqi artists the themes that his paintings tackle are the same reccuring themes of loss, struggle, war, and destruction, which he presents in a way that engages the viewer by trying to build a script, and a form of a conversation between the characters that are being portrayed and that viewer. Most often, you are forced to create and imagine your own scenario due to the static characters that are purposefully portrayed as if they are in dire need to share and converse their emotions to you indirectly through an imagined monologue that is exhibited by the acts seen between those characters; eventually giving his work a highly surreal element, yet as mentioned earlier remains to be grounded within a Russian figurative style. 

Mahood Ahmed is another treasure the Iraqi culture have lost by disengaging him, like many other artists in different fields, from their social and institutional spheres. It is heartbreaking that these artists who highly deserve recognition from their own people at first, but also from the global artistic scene, are being left out and ignored when the society is in dire need of them to eliminate the corruption and bloodshed that exists within the Iraqi society most importantly.

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Ya Habibi (Asmahan Cover)

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Where Were You When The Lights Went Out (2013)
Yemeni Artist SALWA ALERYANI

In this series, Salwa Aleryani collects electricity bills from her family and writes on them different verses from poems that reference light and darkness, literal or metaphorical, seeking to criticize the current blackouts and lack of electricity Yemen is experiencing at a time when they are producing more than sufficient energy resources. From this, she tries to understand how that darkness affects ones emotions and mental state, since one can predict that without electricity an individual is left in a state of active discovery rather than mere a routine. Even in darkness and stillness ones mind is always occupied with thoughts that allows them to reflect and ponder. In addition, she also tries to reflect on the value of those two outlets; electricity and poetry, and how much they shape our perceptions of darkness and guidance, if one is to think of light as guidance. In these two samples, the artist chose verses from Mahmoud Darwish(top and middle) and Wallace Stevens (bottom) .

Click on Images for Translation. 

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YemenYemeni ArtSalwa AleryaniInstallationArtArtistMena ArtMiddle Eastthe second Darwish verse is wrong btw it should have said habasto and not hasabto.caged not counted.

isqineeha:

Where Were You When The Lights Went Out (2013)
Yemeni Artist SALWA ALERYANI

In this series, Salwa Aleryani collects electricity bills from her family and writes on them different verses from poems that reference light and darkness, literal or metaphorical, seeking to criticize the current blackouts and lack of electricity Yemen is experiencing at a time when they are producing more than sufficient energy resources. From this, she tries to understand how that darkness affects ones emotions and mental state, since one can predict that without electricity an individual is left in a state of active discovery rather than mere a routine. Even in darkness and stillness ones mind is always occupied with thoughts that allows them to reflect and ponder. In addition, she also tries to reflect on the value of those two outlets; electricity and poetry, and how much they shape our perceptions of darkness and guidance, if one is to think of light as guidance. In these two samples, the artist chose a verse from Pablo Neruda's Critical Sonata (top) and a verse by Yemeni poet Abdulhakim Alfaqih (bottom).

Click on Images for Translation. 

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before I moved to here many years ago a dear friend left this ahmad matar poem on the cover of her ahlam mosteghanemi’s Memory in the Flesh copy she sent from Syria. It is the only book I brought here with me from back home; the poem, the novel, the smell of the pages that are mixed with her smell of Syria and my adolescence home are all very surreal and painful now.

before I moved to here many years ago a dear friend left this ahmad matar poem on the cover of her ahlam mosteghanemi’s Memory in the Flesh copy she sent from Syria. It is the only book I brought here with me from back home; the poem, the novel, the smell of the pages that are mixed with her smell of Syria and my adolescence home are all very surreal and painful now.

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i am thinking of the journey of this book too from beirut to damascus to dubai to torontoto here and I wonder where it will rest next

Five days ago (5th of September) the Iraqi Airforce bombed the Children’s Department of Al Hawija General Hospital near Kirkuk. The airstrike targeted that department specifically, leaving more than 20 dead and 40 injured, mostly women and children. This video here is taken a couple of days after the event. People of Al Hawija in particular have been brutalized from all sides; U.S Airstrikes, ISIS, and the Iraqi government/military. With all of this intentional murder by the Iraqi Military that has been going on for months (if not years if you want to consider all the events prior to the recent airstrikes), you still have Iraqis who are blatantly supporting this corrupt savage institution and demonstrating across the world in its support.

fuck the u.s, fuck the iraqi military, and fuck isis.

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خرا بيكم و خرا بكلشي

isqineeha:

Part of “And Peace Be Upon You O Fallujah وسلاما عليك يا فلوجة"audio collage by Tadhamun (Iraqi Women Solidarity Organization) is this beautiful musical piece; My Journey to Baghdad by Iraqi Pianist Narmeen Zangana. This performance was part of “A Day in Iraq” conference organized by Tadhmun earlier in 2013 in London, UK. It is worth noting that Tadhamun is founded by Iraqi writer and activist Haifa Zangana.

You can also listen to a shorter and clearer Studio version here

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isqineeha:

Produced by Tadhamun (Iraqi Women Organization), And Peace Be Upon You O Fallujah is an audio collage and a 20 page booklet that pays a heartbreaking homage to the people of al Fallujah, telling the story of the two main U.S led attacks on Al Fallujah in April and November of 2004. The collage begins with the voices of children playing around and gradually fades into the recurring and too familiar background sound of Apache helicopters underlying a short disturbing conversation between a group of American soldiers and Iraqi children:

The U.S soldier is heard asking the child “Do you want candy?” in which the child responds with pure innocence, only to hear the U.S soldier telling him with all inhumanity “I don’t have any candy, do you want a hand grenade?” causing the child to fearfully respond with “No! No! No! No!”

Starting with this conversation, the audio collage situates the listener into an emotional state that highlights the social construct that surrounds occupation, people in power, and the resulting fear. Because in reality, children across Iraq were the victims of all sorts of bombs during the invasion and occupation at the hands of those soldiers, their allies, and the collaborators.
The collage also features Iraqi and non-Iraqi poems, resistance folk songs from al Fallujah, musical pieces played by Iraqi artists, comments by a U.S commander, a short excerpt of an interview with Noam Chomsky, a resident of al Fallujah speaking about their plight and the destruction, and appropriately ends with the voices of those same children you heard in the beginning; reminding us of the loss and tragedy of the people of al Fallujah.
You can listen to an excerpt of this heart-wrenching collage here
Purchases of the CD and Booklet can be done through the BrussellsTribunal
Tadhamun’s Mission Statement:

Tadhamun (solidarity) is an Iraqi women organization, encompasses many organisations and individuals standing by Iraqi women’s struggle against neo-colonial order, regional power hegemony and sectarian politics in Iraq. Fighting for equal citizenship across ethnicities and religions, for human rights, and gender equality.

isqineeha:

Produced by Tadhamun (Iraqi Women Organization), And Peace Be Upon You O Fallujah is an audio collage and a 20 page booklet that pays a heartbreaking homage to the people of al Fallujah, telling the story of the two main U.S led attacks on Al Fallujah in April and November of 2004. The collage begins with the voices of children playing around and gradually fades into the recurring and too familiar background sound of Apache helicopters underlying a short disturbing conversation between a group of American soldiers and Iraqi children:

The U.S soldier is heard asking the child “Do you want candy?” in which the child responds with pure innocence, only to hear the U.S soldier telling him with all inhumanity “I don’t have any candy, do you want a hand grenade?” causing the child to fearfully respond with “No! No! No! No!”

Starting with this conversation, the audio collage situates the listener into an emotional state that highlights the social construct that surrounds occupation, people in power, and the resulting fear. Because in reality, children across Iraq were the victims of all sorts of bombs during the invasion and occupation at the hands of those soldiers, their allies, and the collaborators.

The collage also features Iraqi and non-Iraqi poems, resistance folk songs from al Fallujah, musical pieces played by Iraqi artists, comments by a U.S commander, a short excerpt of an interview with Noam Chomsky, a resident of al Fallujah speaking about their plight and the destruction, and appropriately ends with the voices of those same children you heard in the beginning; reminding us of the loss and tragedy of the people of al Fallujah.

You can listen to an excerpt of this heart-wrenching collage here

Purchases of the CD and Booklet can be done through the BrussellsTribunal

Tadhamun’s Mission Statement:

Tadhamun (solidarity) is an Iraqi women organization, encompasses many organisations and individuals standing by Iraqi women’s struggle against neo-colonial order, regional power hegemony and sectarian politics in Iraq. Fighting for equal citizenship across ethnicities and religions, for human rights, and gender equality.

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أسبرين و رصاصة  Aspirin and a Bullet (2011) is the first feature film by Syrian multimedia artist Ammar Al Beik. The 2-hour autobiographical black and white film follows the conversations and confessions of those souls close to Ammar. This scene her is of one of the conversations between the filmmaker and his mother. Here is a short synopsis of the film by the artist: 

Aspirin and a bullet is the title of a very concise autobiography, the title of a 40 years-long therapy session that I preferred to going to the clinics of psychiatrists who get paid for their time and attention. Aspirin and a bullet is an audio-visual recording full of confession, poetry, pain and cinema. This recording is the film that sets me free from the heaviness of memory and its complexes. My father and my mother, my friend and our mistresses, all sat in front of me to convey about me and them.

The full film is officially available to watch for free here.

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Ammar Al BeikArtFilmSyriaI urge all to watch itwokring on a short review of this film and feature of the artist in the upcoming few weeksugh watch this and cry and smile and grasp your heart though

اسقينيها

isqineeha:

Isqineeha أسقنيها - Asmahan 

never forget that this was the blog’s inspiration :’)))

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أسقنيها بأبي انت و أمي لا لتجلو الهمَ عني فأنت همَي